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ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus financed within the institutional grant by the Government of Sweden.
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Author
  • Tinatin Akhvlediani
  • Giorgi Nebulishvili
  • Elene Kvanchilashvili
  • Ana Terashvili
  • Elene Tskhomelidze
  • Nutsa Shubashvili
  • Mariam Titvinidze
  • Ketevan Muradashvili
  • Elene Nikuradze
  • Aleksandra Shalibashvili
  • Tamar Mdzeluri
  • Eka Nozadze
  • Nutsa Bazlidze
  • Archil Chapichadze
  • Giorgi Bakradze
  • George Papava
  • Mery Julakidze
  • Givi Melkadze
  • Giorgi Machavariani
  • Giorgi Mekerishvili
  • Nino Abashidze
  • Rezo Geradze
  • Giorgi Bregadze
  • Giorgi Kelbakiani
  • Giorgi Tsutskiridze
  • Ia Vardishvili
  • Robizon Khubulashvili
  • Adam Pellillo
  • Saba Devdariani
  • Nino Mosiashvili
  • Nikoloz Pkhakadze
  • Charles Johnson
  • Maya Grigolia
  • Lasha Lanchava
  • Nino Doghonadze
  • Mariam Zaldastanishvili
  • Zurab Abramishvili
  • Gigla Mikautadze
  • Ivane Pirveli
  • Irakli Galdava
  • Florian Biermann
  • Irakli Shalikashvili
  • Olga Azhgibetseva
  • Phatima Mamardashvili
  • Eric Livny
  • David Zhorzholiani
  • Nino Kakulia
  • Laura Manukyan
  • Irakli Barbakadze
  • Lika Goderdzishvili
  • Selam Petersson
  • Sophiko Skhirtladze
  • Irakli Kochlamazashvili
  • Levan Pavlenishvili
  • Gocha Kardava
  • Rati Porchkhidze
  • Lasha Labadze
  • Muhammad Asali
  • Karine Torosyan
  • Levan Tevdoradze
  • Mariam Katsadze
  • Ana Burduli
  • Davit Keshelava
  • Giorgi Mzhavanadze
  • Elene Seturidze
  • Tamta Maridashvili
  • Mariam Tsulukidze
  • Erekle Shubitidze
  • Guram Lobzhanidze
  • Mariam Lobjanidze
  • Mariam Chachava
  • Maka Chitanava
  • Salome Deisadze
  • Ia Katsia
  • Salome Gelashvili
  • Tamar Sulukhia
  • Norberto Pignatti
  • Giorgi Papava
  • Luc Leruth
  • Yaroslava Babych
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Forest fires and climate change in Georgia – potential ways forward
The Russian invasion of Ukraine, as well as the global pandemic, have diverted the world’s attention and in general, put climate change and the green economy onto the back burner of the political agenda.
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Challenges and opportunities – making the Georgian energy sector more secure
During the Russia-Ukraine the EU has become a clear example of how substantial reliance on a single country to satisfy energy needs can threaten nations’ economic development, and how challenging the task of achieving energy security is while substantially depending on a single country in key energy products.
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The impact of COVID-19 on tobacco consumption in Georgia
Excessive tobacco consumption is an important public health policy issue. According to estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO), 32% of the adult population in Georgia smoked tobacco in 2019 (WHO, 2021). The prevalence of smoking in men was 56.9 percent – the fourth in the world and first in Europe.
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Developing a circular economy in Georgia – the benefits, achievements, and challenges
Circular economy and integrated waste management are both concepts we often hear when discussing issues of ecological well-being or climate change. This way of imagining the economy has already gained a foothold in many countries. The idea of the circular economy itself implies a different attitude towards patterns of production and consumption, that which aims to minimize wasted resources.
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Is climate change a serious threat that affects you?
Today is 24 March, and it’s been snowing heavily in Tsavkisi for the past few days. My yard and street are covered by about a full meter of snow. Cars are stuck on the snow-covered streets and our small community is physically cut off from the rest of the world. Locals can’t remember such a snowstorm, especially in March.
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How has Ukraine offered an opportunity for the world to become better, and how is the world responding?
The war in Ukraine had just begun when I wrote (on the ISET Policy Institute's website and in the Georgian Times) that the present events in Ukraine offer the world a chance to become better. I could not have predicted at the time that hostilities would unfold in such a disastrous fashion or scale, nor could I have anticipated that, following four weeks of the war, we would witness an even larger and, I would say unimaginable human and global catastrophe.
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