ISET

ISET continues its student policy paper seminar series for the institute's (now graduated) second-year students. This time, Tatia Sosiashvili, Megi Tsikoridze, Nino Aladashvili, and Sopo Basilidze presented their joint paper on tax administration in Georgia. Their project, entitled “Current Challenges in Tax Administration (VAT)”, was supervised by Eric Livny, President of ISET and the ISET Policy Institute, and Sophiko Skhirtladze, an ISET Resident Faculty member and head of the Private Sector Development Policy Research Center.

The students explained that tax administration is an important tool for the government to implement and enforce tax laws and receive mandates by law. It includes the management of taxpayers’ registration, including the detection of non-registration and false registration; the processing of tax returns, withholdings and third-party information; the verification or examination of the correctness and completeness of received information; the process of enforced debt collection, and the handling of administrative appeals and complaints.

On May 23, ISET-PI hosted the launch ceremony of ReforMeter, which was attended by representatives of Government institutions, NGOs and international organizations. Welcoming remarks were made by Shamennna K. Gall, the acting Deputy Economic Growth Offices of the US Embassy, and Bruno Balvanera, the EBRD Director for the Caucasus, Moldova and Belarus.

ReforMeter is an online platform which generates reform progress analysis for policy making and public dialogue, and builds trust between the government, the private sector and the general public. The project is implemented by the ISET Policy Institute and financed by USAID G4G.

A researcher of the Private Sector Development Policy Research Centre, Olga Azhgibetseva, attended a three- week intensive training program in Sweden.

Around 60 participants from five countries (Albania, Georgia, Kosovo, Moldova and Ukraine) attended the course. Each country was represented by a group of professionals consisted of businessmen or people serving in top positions in their organizations, which were a mix of business support organizations, ministries, chambers or research and policy centers. Georgia was the largest group with 13 participants.

The Private Sector Growth strategies training program included the following modules:

On December 23, a lunch meeting was organized for EPAC members to discuss whether laws on antidumping are necessary. The event was organized by Georgian Lawyers for Independent Professions, Governing for Growth (G4G), and the Society of Free Individuals. ISET Policy Institute researcher Gigla Mikautadze was invited as a guest speaker, and presented his views on the need for antidumping regulations and possible economic consequences. Despite the fact that many countries regulate prices of imported goods, there are dozens of countries not having any antidumping law.

Betsy’s Hotel is an establishment accustomed to hosting a wide variety of patrons from across the world. However, the gathering of mid-level and senior representatives from public, private and non-profit organizations to be awarded certificates for completing a course funded by Japan Tobacco International Georgia and run by the ISET Policy Institute is certainly unique even for a hotel with such a habitually diverse clientele.

The training program, entitled ‘Leaders in Development’, was devised for policy makers, analysts and executives from both the public and private sectors, and highlighted the importance of understanding economic concepts for professional and national development. The program's ten modules focused on the implications of government regulations for Georgian businesses across a broad range of policy areas: from taxation and tax administration to food safety and environmental standards.

Our Partners